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New for AWS Transit Gateway – Build Global Networks and Centralize Monitoring Using Network Manager

As your company grows and gets the benefits of a cloud-based infrastructure, your on-premises sites like offices and stores increasingly need high performance private connectivity to AWS and to other sites at a reasonable cost. Growing your network is hard, because traditional branch networks based on leased lines are costly, and they suffer from the same lack of elasticity and agility as traditional data centers.

At the same time, it becomes increasingly complex to manage and monitor a global network that is spread across AWS Regions and on-premises sites. You need to stitch together data from these diverse locations. This results in an inconsistent operational experience, increased costs and efforts, and missed insights from the lack of visibility across different technologies.

Today, we want to make it easier to build, manage, and monitor global networks with the following new capabilities for AWS Transit Gateway:

These new networking capabilities enable you to optimize your network using AWS’s global backbone, and to centrally visualize and monitor your global network. More specifically:

  • Inter-region peering and accelerated VPN improve application performance by leveraging the AWS Global Network. In this way, you can reduce the number of leased-lines required to operate your network, optimizing your cost and improving agility. Transit Gateway inter-region peering sends inter region traffic privately over AWS’s global network backbone. Accelerated VPN uses AWS Global Accelerator to route VPN traffic from remote locations through the closest AWS edge location to improve connection performance.
  • Network Manager reduces the operational complexity of managing a global network across AWS and on-premises. With Network Manager, you set up a global view of your private network simply by registering your Transit Gateways and on-premises resources. Your global network can then be visualized and monitored via a centralized operational dashboard.

These features allow you to optimize connectivity from on-premises sites to AWS and also between on-premises sites, by routing traffic through Transit Gateways and the AWS Global Network, and centrally managing through Network Manager.

Visualizing Your Global Network
In the Network Manager console, that you can reach from the Transit Gateways section of the Amazon Virtual Private Cloud console, you have an overview of your global networks. Each global network includes AWS and on-premises resources. Specifically, it provides a central point of management for your AWS Transit Gateways, your physical devices and sites connected to the Transit Gateways via Site-to-Site VPN Connections, and AWS Direct Connect locations attached to the Transit Gateways.

For example, this is the Geographic view of a global network covering North America and Europe with 5 Transit Gateways in 3 AWS Regions, 80 VPCs, 50 VPNs, 1 Direct Connect location, and 16 on-premises sites with 50 devices:

As I zoom in the map, I get a description on what these nodes represent, for example if they are AWS Regions, Direct Connect locations, or branch offices.

I can select any node in the map to get more information. For example, I select the US West (Oregon) AWS Region to see the details of the two Transit Gateways I am using there, including the state of all VPN connections, VPCs, and VPNs handled by the selected Transit Gateway.

Selecting a site, I get a centralized view with the status of the VPN connections, including site metadata such as address, location, and description. For example, here are the details of the Colorado branch offices.

In the Topology panel, I see the logical relationship of all the resources in my network. On the left here, there is the entire topology of my global network, on the right the detail of the European part. Connections statuses are reported in color in the topology view.

Selecting any node in the topology map displays details specific to the resource type (Transit Gateway, VPC, customer gateway, and so on) including links to the corresponding service in the AWS console to get more information and configure the resource.

Monitoring Your Global Network
Network Manager is using Amazon CloudWatch, which collects raw data and processes it into readable, near real-time metrics for data in/out, packets dropped, and VPN connection status.

These statistics are kept for 15 months, so that you can access historical information and gain a better perspective on how your web application or service is performing. You can also set alarms that watch for certain thresholds, and send notifications or take actions when those thresholds are met.

For example, these are the last 12 hours of Monitoring for the Transit Gateway in Europe (Ireland).

In the global network view, you have a single point of view of all events affecting your network, simplifying root cause analysis in case of issues. Clicking on any of the messages in the console will take to a more detailed view in the Events tab.

Your global network events are also delivered by CloudWatch Events. Using simple rules that you can quickly set up, you can match events and route them to one or more target functions or streams. To process the same events, you can also use the additional capabilities offered by Amazon EventBridge.

Network Manager sends the following types of events:

  • Topology changes, for example when a VPN connection is created for a transit gateway.
  • Routing updates, such as when a route is deleted in a transit gateway route table.
  • Status updates, for example in case a VPN tunnel’s BGP session goes down.

Configuring Your Global Network
To get your on-premises resources included in the above visualizations and monitoring, you need to input into Network Manager information about your on-premises devices, sites, and links. You also need to associate devices with the customer gateways they host for VPN connections.

Our software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) partners, such as Cisco, Aruba, Silver Peak, and Aviatrix, have configured their SD-WAN devices to connect with Transit Gateway Network Manager in only a few clicks. Their SD-WANs also define the on-premises devices, sites, and links automatically in Network Manager. SD-WAN integrations enable to include your on-premises network in the Network Manager global dashboard view without requiring you to input information manually.

Available Now
AWS Transit Gateway Network Manager is a global service available for Transit Gateways in the following regions: US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (N. California), US West (Oregon), Europe (Ireland), Europe (Frankfurt), Europe (London), Europe (Paris), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), Asia Pacific (Seoul), Asia Pacific (Sydney), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), Canada (Central), South America (São Paulo).

There is no additional cost for using Network Manager. You pay for the network resources you use, like Transit Gateways, VPNs, and so on. Here you can find more information on pricing for VPN and Transit Gateway.

You can learn more in the documentation of the Network Manager, inter-region peering, and accelerated VPN.

With these new features, you can take advantage of the performance of our AWS Global Network, and simplify network management and monitoring across your AWS and on-premises resources.

Danilo

Feed Source: AWS News Blog
Article Source: New for AWS Transit Gateway – Build Global Networks and Centralize Monitoring Using Network Manager

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