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Mozilla Fights for Net Neutrality this May (and Always)

Mozilla is continuing to fight for net neutrality — in the courts, alongside Americans, on Twitter and, today, by joining the Red Alert protest.

The Red Alert protest raises awareness about net neutrality’s importance, and the means for keeping it intact: In mid-May, the Senate will vote on a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to overturn the FCC’s net neutrality repeal. We’re partnering with organizations like Consumer Reports, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Reddit to encourage Americans to call Congress in support of net neutrality.

Says Ashley Boyd, Mozilla’s VP of Advocacy:

“Policymakers need to listen to their constituents: The majority of Americans are in favor of strong net neutrality rules. Mozilla’s latest public opinion poll reveals that outside of Washington, D.C., net neutrality isn’t a partisan issue. 91% of Americans believe consumers should be able to freely and quickly access their preferred content on the internet.”

 

Says Denelle Dixon, Mozilla COO:

“We are proud to be a leader in the fight for net neutrality both through our legal challenge in Mozilla v. FCC and through our deep work in education and advocacy for an open, equal, accessible internet. Today, Mozilla joins many other companies and civil society organizations to take another stand for net neutrality, as we try to protect against erosion into a discriminatory internet, with ultimately a far worse experience for any users and businesses who don’t pay more for special treatment.”

“Mozilla will always fight for net neutrality because it is fundamental for free speech, competition, and innovation online. Net neutrality is a core characteristic of the internet as we know it, and crucial for the economy and everyday lives. It is imperative that all internet traffic be treated equally, without discrimination against content or type of traffic — that’s how the internet was built and what has made it one of the greatest inventions of all time.”

 

To get involved: Call your members of Congress and express your support for net neutrality.


Last month, Mozilla published results from a nationwide poll that reveals where Americans stand on net neutrality. The survey reinforces what grassroots action has already demonstrated: Americans support equal access.

Mozilla and Ipsos conducted this public opinion poll in February of 2018, surveying 1,007 American adults from across 50 states. Among our key findings:

  • Outside of Washington, D.C., net neutrality isn’t a partisan issue. Americans from red and blue states alike agree that equal access to the internet is a right: 79% of Colorado residents, 81% of Arizona residents, and 80% of North Carolina residents

 

  • 91% of Americans believe consumers should be able to freely and quickly access their preferred content on the internet. Only 9% of Americans think ISPs should be able to offer fast lanes with quicker load times. Support for net neutrality is growing: When Mozilla and Ipsos asked this same question in 2017, 86% of Americans believed the former.

 

  • 78% of Americans believe equal access to the internet is a right. This opinion is most common among younger Americans (84% of adults under the age of 35).

 

  • 76% of Americans believe internet service providers (ISPs) should treat all consumer data the same, and not speed up or slow down specific content. This opinion is most common among older Americans (80% of adults ages 55+) and Americans with a college degree (81%).

 

  • 63% of Americans do not think that ISPs will voluntarily look out for consumers’ best interests, compared to 32% who agree with this statement. Faith in ISPs in declining: When Mozilla and Ipsos asked this same question in 2017, 37% of Americans trusted ISPs.

See the full results from our poll here.

The post Mozilla Fights for Net Neutrality this May (and Always) appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

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